Bring Music to your life

Picture: UnnarYmir

Music is important element in enhancing our spirit.

Music has been with us for millennia and has been used in all kinds of ceremonies throughout.

Listen to whatever you like and give all kinds of music a chance. Remember that to much Blues can bring you down to sadness.  Even that can be thrilling to understand the effect of music.

Use some for traveling, other to go with your work and then your favorite soft music before you turn in for your sleep. Use your favorite Christmas songs and other in the summer. Today it is easy to have music in our portable IPods or radios wherever.

Some parents play classical music for the children before sleep to calm them down.That is also quite effective during the day to use music and singing to enhance their mood. Some research has even shown that children who listen to classical music show better response in IQ tests.

Music Therapy is aimed at enhance children’s attention, recognition, communication as well as other personal or social skills. Music Therapy has been showed  to help patients to help patients to reduce stress and relax (Guzzetta, 1989). Start your own music therapy to enhance your mood and bring contentment into your life systematically.

If you have problems with sleep, then you can try to listen to soft music the last hour and see if your mood will not ease down and your train of thought will slow down.

Remember how much music plays a part in most religious activities. Music is there to give deeper meaning to the ceremony and so could music do to you any time. So whenever you feel down, sorrow or at loss. Take a time to play your favorite music. Play music as often as you can during the day.

Have your CD´s at hand so it is easy to pick your favorites out and play. Give all kinds of music a chance and try out soft music, playful music or music from foreign countries.

Bjorn Vernhardsson psychologist

Reference:

Guzzetta, C., E. (1989). Effects of relaxation and music therapy on patients in a coronary care unit with presumptive acute myocardial infarction. The Journal of Critical Care, 18. Pgs.609 – 16.

http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/2684920/reload=0;jsessionid=6iCh2ul9n4QIajKfC8nr.19

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